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The Three Stooges Online Filmography
"It's tremendous!" It's colossal!" It's putrid!" - Moe, Larry and Shemp (ALL GUMMED UP, 1947)

Stooge Trivia

  • 3 DUMB CLUCKS (1937)
    • During filming, Curly fell down the set's prop elevator shaft, hit his head on a 2x4, and suffered a severe cut on his head.
      Source: The Three Stooges Scrapbook
      Added by xraffle on 2009-03-22 02:50:08
      Status: Confirmed
      Team Stooge Comments: The wound was tended to with spirit gum, and covered with makeup. Filming continued. The cut can be seen as a dark blemish on Curly's scalp, particularly the haberdasher scene.


  • A GEM OF A JAM (1943)
    • This is actually the first Stooges short to feature the swing rendition of "3 Blind Mice," during the closing fadeout.
      Source: A GEM OF A JAM (1943)
      Added by MR77100 on 2009-04-10 11:58:28
      Status: Confirmed


  • A PAIN IN THE PULLMAN (1936)
    • Remade in 1947 with Gus Schilling and Richard Lane as TRAINING FOR TROUBLE.
      Source: The Columbia Comedy Shorts
      Added by [Unknown] on 2011-01-05 03:25:56
      Status: Confirmed
      Team Stooge Comments: A PAIN IN THE PULLMAN was a remake of SHOW BUSINESS (1932), one of Hal Roach Studios' Thelma Todd & Zasu Pitts comedy shorts, and directed by Jules White.


  • BACK TO THE WOODS (1937)
    • The was the first Stooges short to feature old footage from a previous short - the ending canoe scene is from WHOOPS I'M AN INDIAN! (1936).
      Source: BACK TO THE WOODS (1937)
      Added by MR77100 on 2009-06-01 11:02:09
      Status: Confirmed


  • BEER BARREL POLECATS (1946)
    • The last short to feature supporting actor Eddie Laughton. He was born the same year as Curly, and died the same year as Curly!
      Source: Eddie Laughton (cast)
      Added by MR77100 on 2009-04-18 01:18:15
      Status: Confirmed
      Team Stooge Comments: In stock footage, Laughton also appeared in PEST MAN WINS (1951).


  • BLUNDER BOYS (1955)
    • This was the final original Shemp short subject.
      Source: BLUNDER BOYS (1955)
      Added by MR77100 on 2009-04-27 12:59:43
      Status: Confirmed


  • BOOBY DUPES (1945)
    • The final short to feature the Columbia "torch lady" in the opening credits.
      Source: BOOBY DUPES (1945)
      Added by MR77100 on 2009-04-30 09:15:37
      Status: Confirmed


  • COMMOTION ON THE OCEAN (1956)
    • The fourth and final "Fake Shemp" short featuring Joe Palma as a double.
      Source: COMMOTION ON THE OCEAN (1956)
      Added by MR77100 on 2009-05-29 12:05:49
      Status: Confirmed


  • CRASH GOES THE HASH (1944)
    • This was the last stooges short to feature Bud Jamison. He passed away in September 1944 at the age of 50.
      Source: The Complete Three Stooges, by Jon Solomon
      Added by xraffle on 2009-03-22 03:25:53
      Status: Confirmed


  • CRIME ON THEIR HANDS (1948)
    • The final short to feature supporting actor Cy Schindell, who died from cancer shortly after. However, old footage featuring him would turn up in later shorts.
      Source: Cy Schindell (cast)
      Added by MR77100 on 2009-05-12 12:32:20
      Status: Confirmed


  • DISORDER IN THE COURT (1936)
    • When Larry and Curly and playing "Have You Even Seen a Lassie?" on Moe while he has the harmonica in his stomach, the camera cuts to a shot of the courtroom audience. Second from the right in the front row is Solomon Horwitz, Moe's father.
      Source: DISORDER IN THE COURT (1936)
      Added by MR77100 on 2009-04-02 05:48:52
      Status: Confirmed
      Team Stooge Comments: Mr. Horwitz can be seen in more than one camera shot during the film.

    • This is the first short to feature a remodeled logo of "The Columbia Torch Lady."
      Source: DISORDER IN THE COURT (1936)
      Added by MR77100 on 2009-04-07 10:02:00
      Status: Confirmed
      Team Stooge Comments: In use since 1924, "The Columbia Torch Lady" (not the Statue of Liberty) was remodeled for the 1936-1937 release season, adding a pedestal, removing the woman's headdress, enlarging the Columbia name with chiseled block lettering, and animating the torch lights.


  • DIZZY PILOTS (1943)
    • This is the last appearance of supporting actor Richard Fiske, who was killed in the war in France the following year.
      Source: Richard Fiske Cast Listing
      Added by MR77100 on 2010-02-23 11:55:49
      Status: Partially False
      Team Stooge Comments: Fiske's appearance in DIZZY PILOTS (1943) was stock footage from BOOBS IN ARMS (1940). The last Three Stooges film he worked on was IN THE SWEET PIE AND PIE (1941).


  • DOCTOR DEATH: SEEKER OF SOULS (1973)
    • John Considine, who plays Doctor Death, is the brother of Tim Considine, who played Mike on MY THREE SONS.
      Source: wikipedia
      Added by archiezappa on 2009-06-03 12:18:09
      Status: Confirmed

    • This is the final feature film appearance of Moe Howard.
      Source: Moe Howard filmography
      Added by archiezappa on 2009-06-03 12:24:09
      Status: Confirmed

    • Barry Coe also appears in THE BRAVADOS, featuring Joe DeRita.
      Source: THE BRAVADOS (1958)
      Added by archiezappa on 2009-06-03 01:03:57
      Status: Confirmed


  • FALSE ALARMS (1936)
    • Moe's father, Solomon Horwitz, is visible as a passerby on the sidewalk. After Moe and Larry arrive at the false alarm called in by Curly, Solomon passes in the background, walking from right to left and wearing a white hat. This occurs while Curly quotes, "I got ya out, didn't I?"
      Source: FALSE ALARMS (1936)
      Added by MR77100 on 2009-04-02 06:23:15
      Status: Confirmed
      Team Stooge Comments: Mr. Horwitz can also be seen as a passerby after the car crashes into the streetlamp pole.


  • FIFI BLOWS HER TOP (1958)
    • The final short to feature Phil Van Zandt, who committed suicide almost exactly one year after filming.
      Source: Phil Van Zandt (cast)
      Added by MR77100 on 2009-05-25 12:09:06
      Status: Confirmed


  • FLAT FOOT STOOGES (1938)
    • This short marked the debut of supporting actor Dick Curtis.
      Source: Dick Curtis (Cast database)
      Added by ProfessorStooge on 2010-06-07 11:24:53
      Status: Confirmed

    • "Hey, we're doin' the Corrigan!" A reference to aviator "Wrong Way" Corrigan, who left NY for CA, and landed in Ireland.
      Source: Encyclopedia Britannica
      Added by BeAStooge on 2011-02-07 05:27:52
      Status: Confirmed


  • FLYING SAUCER DAFFY (1958)
    • This was the final original stooges short released.
      Source: Moe, Larry & Joe Filmography (1957 - 1959)
      Added by MR77100 on 2009-05-28 12:49:05
      Status: Confirmed
      Team Stooge Comments: It is the last short released which contained an original story, not a remake of an earlier film. The final short released was SAPPY BULL FIGHTERS (1959); FLYING SAUCER DAFFY (1958) was the final short produced.


  • FOR CRIMIN' OUT LOUD (1956)
    • Submitted by member Stoogephilia...

      In the Miracle Detective Agency sequence, Moe says "Remind me to kill you later" to Shemp, and Shemp replies "I won't have time later" which foreshadows his death on November 22, 1955, several months after this scene was filmed.

      Source: FOR CRIMIN' OUT LOUD (1956)
      Added by BeAStooge on 2010-07-17 08:01:29
      Status: Confirmed
      Team Stooge Comments: FOR CRIMIN' OUT LOUD's new scenes were filmed in July 1955, and were Shemp's final film appearances before his death in November.


  • FRIGHT NIGHT (1947)
    • This was the first Columbia short to feature Shemp Howard as the third stooge.
      Source: FRIGHT NIGHT (1947)
      Added by MR77100 on 2009-05-29 01:09:19
      Status: Confirmed


  • FROM NURSE TO WORSE (1940)
    • This was the first stooges short to utilize old footage --- it features the traffic sequence from DIZZY DOCTORS.
      Source: FROM NURSE TO WORSE (1940)
      Added by MR77100 on 2009-05-25 12:46:37
      Status: False
      Team Stooge Comments: BACK TO THE WOODS (1937) used footage from WHOOPS, I'M AN INDIAN (1936); A DUCKING THEY DID GO (1939) contains footage from A PAIN IN THE PULLMAN (1936).


  • GENTS IN A JAM (1952)
    • This was the final short to be directed by Edward Bernds, and for that matter, anyone other than Jules White. For here on out, the Stooges would become White's sole responsibility until the end of their contract in 1958.
      Source: GENTS IN A JAM (1952)
      Added by MR77100 on 2009-06-12 01:42:40
      Status: Confirmed
      Team Stooge Comments: The Stooges' contract ended in December 1957.


  • GOOF ON THE ROOF (1953)
    • The last original short where Clyde Bruckman worked with the Stooges. He committed suicide a few years later.
      Source: Clyde Bruckman (crew)
      Added by MR77100 on 2009-05-10 01:49:07
      Status: Confirmed


  • GOOFS AND SADDLES (1937)
    • This is the first appearance of supporting actor Joe Palma, who would play the "Phony Shemp" stand-in in 1956.
      Source: Joe Palma (Cast database)
      Added by MR77100 on 2010-03-09 11:39:01
      Status: Confirmed


  • GUNS A POPPIN! (1957)
    • The first Joe Besser short that was a remake; in this case IDIOTS DELUXE (1945).
      Source: Moe, Larry and Joe filmography
      Added by MR77100 on 2009-05-29 01:26:31
      Status: Confirmed


  • HALF SHOT SHOOTERS (1936)
    • This short marked the debut of long-time Stooge costar Vernon Dent.
      Source: Cast Database - Vernon Dent
      Added by ProfessorStooge on 2010-01-13 11:22:39
      Status: Confirmed

    • The final short to feature the original version of the Columbia Torch Lady with the head dress and the animated flickering torch.
      Source: HALF SHOT SHOOTERS (1936)
      Added by MR77100 on 2011-05-24 01:00:27
      Status: Confirmed


  • HALF-WITS HOLIDAY (1947)
    • During filming, Curly suffered a massive stroke on May 6, 1946, that impaired his health for the rest of his life.
      Source: The Three Stooges Scrapbook
      Added by archiezappa on 2009-03-23 09:44:03
      Status: Confirmed

    • This was Emil Sitka's first film with the Three Stooges.
      Source: The Three Stooges Scrapbook
      Added by archiezappa on 2009-03-23 09:49:24
      Status: Confirmed


  • HE COOKED HIS GOOSE (1952)
    • Sadly, it was during the shooting of this short that Curly passed away.
      Added by MR77100 on 2009-04-27 12:48:42
      Status: False
      Team Stooge Comments: During filming, Moe was informed that he needed to relocate Jerome to a new medical facility. Shortly after moving him to Baldy View Sanitarium in San Gabriel, Jerry Howard died. (The day after Jerry's funeral, production began on UP IN DAISY'S PENTHOUSE.)


  • HEAVENLY DAZE (1948)
    • The script originally had a musical version of the Ten Commandments but was cut by order of the Hays Office.
      Source: The Complete Three Stooges
      Added by ProfessorStooge on 2009-03-22 10:55:59
      Status: Unconfirmed
      Team Stooge Comments: Statements in Moe's autobiography, and a publicity still that may or may not confirm the story, have not been confirmed by scripted evidence in Jules White's files at the Motion Picture Academy.


  • HIGHER THAN A KITE (1943)
    • This is one of the few times Duke York does not play a monster in a Stooge film.
      Source: HIGHER THAN A KITE (1943)
      Added by ProfessorStooge on 2010-10-11 08:51:00
      Status: Confirmed


  • HOLD THAT LION! (1947)
    • This was the only time in Stooge history that the three Horwitz brothers appeared in a short together.
      Source: HOLD THAT LION! (1947)
      Added by MR77100 on 2010-02-13 07:17:17
      Status: Confirmed
      Team Stooge Comments: The footage of Moe, Shemp and Curly was reused in BOOTY AND THE BEAST (1953).


  • HORSES' COLLARS (1935)
    • The only short to be directed by Clyde Bruckman.
      Source: HORSES' COLLARS (1935)
      Added by MR77100 on 2009-04-19 01:08:30
      Status: Confirmed
      Team Stooge Comments: An alcoholic, Bruckman's once prolific directing career was derailed by on-the-job problems caused by his illness. In 1934, he was fired from MAN ON THE FLYING TRAPEZE by [ironically] W. C. Fields, who himself took over; however, Bruckman received the onscreen credit due to directors' guild regulations.


  • HUGS AND MUGS (1950)
    • The only short not to be filmed inside the Columbia studios. It was actually shot at Darmour Studios.
      Added by [Unknown] on 2010-11-25 02:38:40
      Status: False
      Team Stooge Comments: Other post-1945 shorts fall into this category.

      It was common practice for Columbia's shorts unit to lease soundstage space at other studios, particularly along "Poverty Row" and independents, once the original Columbia Gower Gulch stages were demolished in the mid-1940s. A couple examples include RHYTHM AND WEEP (1946), whose rooftop sequence was filmed at Monogram Studios, and MALICE IN THE PALACE (1949) filmed entirely at Darmour Studios.



  • IDIOTS DELUXE (1945)
    • This was the first short to feature the dark background in the opening credits with the theater mask. It would remain with the Stooges for the rest of their career at Columbia.
      Source: IDIOTS DELUXE (1945)
      Added by MR77100 on 2009-04-18 01:13:07
      Status: Confirmed


  • IF A BODY MEETS A BODY (1945)
    • This short is often marred for being the beginning of the "ill Curly" era, with his deep voice and delayed reactions. His health would decline even further in the following short when his skin became pale.
      Source: IF A BODY MEETS A BODY (1945)
      Added by MR77100 on 2009-04-30 09:04:08
      Status: Confirmed
      Team Stooge Comments: A couple of Curly's 1944 appearances also hint at oncoming health problems, particularly THE YOKE'S ON ME.


  • IN THE SWEET PIE AND PIE (1941)
    • This is the last appearance of supporting actor Richard Fiske, who was killed in the war in France in 1944.
      Source: Richard Fiske (cast database)
      Added by MR77100 on 2010-03-06 10:54:58
      Status: Confirmed
      Team Stooge Comments: Although Fiske appeared in 1943's DIZZY PILOTS, that was stock footage; PIE AND PIE was indeed his last work with the Stooges.


  • IT'S A MAD, MAD, MAD, MAD WORLD (1963)

  • KNUTZY KNIGHTS (1954)
    • The last short to feature new footage of supporting actor Vernon Dent, who was already suffering from diabetes.
      Source: KNUTZY KNIGHTS (1954)
      Added by MR77100 on 2009-05-07 12:17:42
      Status: Confirmed


  • KOOK'S TOUR (1970)
    • During the final days of filming, on January 9, 1970, Larry Fine suffered a stroke which left him paralyzed on the left side of his body.
      Source: The Three Stooges Scrapbook
      Added by archiezappa on 2009-03-23 08:40:35
      Status: Confirmed


  • LOCO BOY MAKES GOOD (1942)
    • On March 7, 1946, comedian Harold Lloyd sued writers Clyde Bruckman, director Jules White and Columbia Pictures for Bruckman's use of Lloyd's magician's coat sequence from MOVIE CRAZY (1932) in LOCO BOY MAKES GOOD. Lloyd sought $500,000 in damages.
      Source: The Three Stooges Scrapbook
      Added by archiezappa on 2009-03-23 09:36:26
      Status: Confirmed


  • MALICE IN THE PALACE (1949)

  • MEN IN BLACK (1934)
    • The stooges were cut by flying glass in one the scenes where the glass door slams.
      Source: Moe Howard and The Three Stooges
      Added by MR77100 on 2009-03-25 06:03:57
      Status: Confirmed


  • MICRO-PHONIES (1945)
    • The "Sextet From Lucy" really is from Lucia di Lammermoor, a dramma tragico (tragic opera) in three acts by Gaetano Donizetti. This opera was based upon Sir Walter Scott's historical novel The Bride of Lammermoor. The opera premiered on 26 September 1835.
      Source: The Metropolitan Opera International Radio Broadcast Information Center
      Added by FineBari3 on 2011-01-03 02:15:21
      Status: Confirmed


  • MOVIE MANIACS (1936)
    • Deleted is an alternate film ending where the stooges accidentally burn the studio down.
      Source: The Three Stooges Journal # 100
      Added by xraffle on 2009-03-22 02:57:13
      Status: Confirmed


  • MUMMY'S DUMMIES (1948)
    • This was the only short in the first three Shemp seasons that was not remade.
      Source: MUMMY'S DUMMIES (1948)
      Added by MR77100 on 2009-04-18 12:49:18
      Status: Confirmed


  • MUSCLE UP A LITTLE CLOSER (1957)
    • This is the first short where Moe and Larry abandon their typical Stooge haircuts.
      Source: MUSCLE UP A LITTLE CLOSER (1957)
      Added by MR77100 on 2009-04-27 01:20:22
      Status: Confirmed


  • NERTSERY RHYMES (1933)
    • This is the first film appearance of Curly.
      Source: Ted Healy & His Stooges filmography
      Added by archiezappa on 2009-05-30 02:34:35
      Status: Confirmed
      Team Stooge Comments: Paparazzi/newsreel footage promoting THE PRIZEFIGHTER AND THE LADY (1933), of the Stooges and Primo Carnera, may have been in theatres earlier than NERTSERY RHYMES. If confirmed, this would actually be Curly's first released film appearance.

    • This was the first time Ted Healy & The Stooges appear in Technicolor.
      Source: NERTSERY RHYMES (1933)
      Added by archiezappa on 2009-05-30 02:38:40
      Status: Confirmed

    • The original and technically proper title of the song "The Turn of a Fan" as intended for the musical revue feature "The March of Time" (MGM, 1930) was "The Fan Episode". The singer is Lottice Howell.
      Source: NERTSERY RHYMES (1933)
      Added by Rich Finegan on 2009-11-11 01:24:44
      Status: Confirmed


  • OIL'S WELL THAT ENDS WELL (1958)
    • The only Stooges short that does not contain any supporting actors.
      Source: OIL'S WELL THAT ENDS WELL (1958)
      Added by MR77100 on 2009-05-09 07:20:03
      Status: Confirmed
      Team Stooge Comments: Although the Stooges are billed as playing all roles in SELF-MADE MAIDS (1950), there is a brief cameo by an extra in the hotel lobby scene.


  • OILY TO BED, OILY TO RISE (1939)

  • PARDON MY BACKFIRE (1953)
    • Jules White was planning on making a whole series of 3-D shorts, but with the "3-D Craze" dying out by this time, this was the last of the two released.
      Source: The Stooge Chronicles
      Added by MR77100 on 2009-03-30 11:13:29
      Status: Confirmed


  • PARDON MY SCOTCH (1935)
    • Moe suffered broken ribs after falling off of a table. Filming resumed after his recovery
      Source: The Three Stooges Scrapbook
      Added by ProfessorStooge on 2009-03-22 09:34:18
      Status: Confirmed

    • The theme music, "Listen to the Mockingbird," was written by the same composer, Septimus Winner, who also crafted "Spelling Bee" (later adapted as "Swinging the Alphabet" in VIOLENT IS THE WORD FOR CURLY).
      Source: Wikipedia
      Added by Dunrobin on 2009-10-21 09:14:00
      Status: Confirmed
      Team Stooge Comments: H/T2 LibraSun

    • The photo of the Stooges used in "Horses' Collars" apparently served as the basis for the cartoon drawing of the Stooges (in kilts) on the title card for "Pardon My Scotch;" the poses are exactly the same. The bottle on the title card reads "Old Pibroch" (pibroch is a type of Scottish music) and the distiller is given as "Haggis & Haggis" (a Scottish "delicacy.")
      Source: Steven R. Wright
      Added by Dunrobin on 2011-06-14 03:08:02
      Status: Confirmed


  • PLAYING THE PONIES (1937)
    • The second and final short directed by Charles Lamont.
      Source: PLAYING THE PONIES (1937)
      Added by MR77100 on 2009-05-29 01:23:02
      Status: Confirmed


  • POP GOES THE EASEL (1935)
    • Moe and Larry's daughters are the two girls playing hopscotch. Joan is the girl on the right with the brown hair. Phyllis is the younger girl on the left with the blonde hair.
      Source: POP GOES THE EASEL (1935)
      Added by MR77100 on 2009-04-06 06:33:47
      Status: Confirmed


  • PUNCH DRUNKS (1934)
    • Curly was fighting against a real pro boxer in this short and received a bloody nose and a cut lip!
      Source: MR77190
      Added by Dunrobin on 2009-03-22 11:24:28
      Status: Partially False
      Team Stooge Comments: 'Killer Kilduff' was played by actor Al Hill, not a professional boxer. But yes, Curly reportedly did receive a bloody nose and cut lip.


  • RESTLESS KNIGHTS (1935)
    • This was the first short to feature the triple slap --- it was used by the father in the opening scene.
      Source: RESTLESS KNIGHT (1935)
      Added by MR77100 on 2009-05-25 12:41:15
      Status: Confirmed


  • RHYTHM AND WEEP (1946)
    • The pill gag was originally written to have Curly pop the pills into his own mouth, but his physical coordination was poor due to his failing heath. The gag, then, had to be changed and Moe ended up popping the pills into Curly's mouth.
      Source: The Complete Three Stooges, by Jon Solomon
      Added by xraffle on 2009-03-22 03:35:20
      Status: Confirmed


  • ROCKIN' THRU THE ROCKIES (1940)
    • Linda Winters, who plays Daisy, changed her name to Dorothy Comingore in later film productions and went on to play the prestigious role of one of the wives of CITIZEN KANE (1941).
      Source: The Three Stooges Scrapbook
      Added by archiezappa on 2009-03-23 09:14:02
      Status: Confirmed


  • RUMPUS IN THE HAREM (1956)
    • This was the first of the four "phony Shemp" shorts, and shows the most new footage with Joe Palma.
      Source: RUMPUS IN THE HAREM (1956)
      Added by MR77100 on 2009-05-18 11:45:41
      Status: Partially False
      Team Stooge Comments: HOT STUFF contains as much Palma-Shemp footage, if not more.


  • SAPPY BULL FIGHTERS (1959)
    • This was the final Stooges short to be released by Columbia.
      Source: SAPPY BULL FIGHTERS (1959)
      Added by MR77100 on 2009-05-18 11:32:13
      Status: Confirmed


  • SAVED BY THE BELLE (1939)
    • The final short directed by Charley Chase.
      Source: Charley Chase (crew)
      Added by MR77100 on 2009-05-04 12:00:02
      Status: Confirmed


  • SCHEMING SCHEMERS (1956)
    • This is the only Stooges short subject to contain footage from three previous shorts: A PLUMBING WE WILL GO (1940), VAGABOND LOAFERS (1949), and HALF-WITS HOLIDAY (1947).
      Source: SCHEMING SCHEMERS (1956)
      Added by MR77100 on 2009-04-27 12:45:35
      Status: Confirmed


  • SCOTCHED IN SCOTLAND (1954)
    • The final short to feature the "swing" rendition of the "Three Blind Mice" theme in the end.
      Source: SCOTCHED IN SCOTLAND (1954)
      Added by MR77100 on 2010-03-30 11:06:09
      Status: Confirmed


  • SING A SONG OF SIX PANTS (1947)
    • This short is one of four that entered the public domain.
      Added by ProfessorStooge on 2010-01-26 08:47:41
      Status: Confirmed


  • SLAPPILY MARRIED (1946)
    • A remake of the 1943 Andy Clyde short A MAID MADE MAD. Monte Collins and Ellwood Ullman still share story credit.
      Source: SLAPPILY MARRIED (1946)
      Added by [Unknown] on 2010-11-24 11:10:19
      Status: Confirmed
      Team Stooge Comments: Other sources include viewing A MAID MADE MAD (1943).

      Story credits usually reference the original story/screenplay contributors, but not always; union requirements generally make this a studio's obligation.



  • SLIPPERY SILKS (1936)
    • During the pastry fight, the supporting cast ran out of cream puffs! They had to scrape every ounce of cream off the floor, along with the dirt and sawdust, to finish the short.
      Source: Moe Howard and The Three Stooges (1977)
      Added by MR77100 on 2009-03-30 12:54:42
      Status: Confirmed


  • SO LONG MR. CHUMPS (1941)
    • Omitted from the final script was one scene where a street policeman notices the Stooges and Pomeroy's girl crying. A double-talk routine develops as to why each person is crying.
      Source: The Three Stooges Journal # 119
      Added by archiezappa on 2009-03-23 09:19:40
      Status: Confirmed
      Team Stooge Comments: The scene was filmed, edited from the final release.


  • SQUAREHEADS OF THE ROUND TABLE (1948)
    • The first stooges short to feature Phil Van Zant.
      Source: Phil Van Zandt (cast)
      Added by MR77100 on 2009-05-29 01:30:17
      Status: Confirmed
      Team Stooge Comments: If Curly had not had his stroke, and the team had starred in PARDON MY TERROR (1946), that would have been Zandt's first short with the Stooges.


  • SWEET AND HOT (1958)
    • The story and screenplay were written by Jerome Gottler, who also wrote the story and screenplay for their musical, WOMAN HATERS. Thus, in SWEET AND HOT, we again have a musical routine and the Stooges appearing in separate roles.
      Source: Jerome S. Gottler (crew)
      Added by MR77100 on 2009-05-29 01:17:34
      Status: Confirmed


  • THE BIG IDEA (1934)

  • THE CAPTAIN HATES THE SEA (1934)
    • This is the Stooges first feature film appearance for Columbia Pictures.
      Source: Moe, Larry & Curly filmography
      Added by archiezappa on 2009-05-30 04:13:22
      Status: Confirmed

    • The long shot of the ship, The San Capeador was used as stock footage for the ship in the 1949 Three Stooges short DUNKED IN THE DEEP (and its 1956 remake COMMOTION ON THE OCEAN) but the scene was reversed, making the lettering on the ship read backwards.
      Source: THE CAPTAIN HATES THE SEA (1934)
      Added by Rich Finegan on 2009-08-07 12:47:11
      Status: Confirmed


  • THE GOOD BAD EGG (1947)
    • A scene by scene remake of the 1937 Andy Clyde short KNEE ACTION.
      Source: The Columbia Comedy Shorts
      Added by [Unknown] on 2010-12-06 04:48:48
      Status: Confirmed


  • THE SITTER DOWNERS (1937)
    • Marcia Healy, who plays Dorabell, is Ted Healy's sister.
      Source: The Three Stooges Scrapbook
      Added by archiezappa on 2009-03-23 09:07:01
      Status: Confirmed


  • THE TOOTH WILL OUT (1951)

  • THEY STOOGE TO CONGA (1943)
    • Due to its violent content, TV stations do not air this short.
      Source: The Official Three Stooges Encylopedia
      Added by ProfessorStooge on 2010-01-15 07:14:37
      Status: False
      Team Stooge Comments: A story that has been told enough times that it has passed into accepted Stooge-mythology, and unfortunately reported as fact in at least one book. While a few local stations may have withheld it for violence issues from time-to-time over the past 50+ years, that has never been an established practice. CONGA's absence from Sony's national-market syndication package since 1999 (along with 59 other shorts) was a business-related decision; local market syndication packages have access to it, and continue to air it, e.g., Chicago, Boston, Philadelphia, others.


  • THREE LITTLE PIGSKINS (1934)
    • Before shooting the scene where the players tackle the stooges and the cameramen, Moe insisted that doubles be used or they would not shoot it at all. Director McCarey had doubles on the set within an hour, and after the scene was shot, the cameramen and two of the stooges' doubles had broken arms and legs! The exception was Curly's double, who had heavy padding.
      Source: Moe Howard & The Three Stooges, by Moe Howard
      Added by xraffle on 2009-03-22 02:44:15
      Status: Confirmed
      Team Stooge Comments: Credit goes to- MR77100

    • Curly broke his leg after riding down the dumbwaiter.
      Source: The Three Stooges Scrapbook
      Added by xraffle on 2009-03-22 02:58:58
      Status: Confirmed

    • Larry lost a tooth when actor Joseph Young socked him in the jaw.
      Source: The Three Stooges Scrapbook
      Added by xraffle on 2009-03-22 02:59:37
      Status: Confirmed

    • The second and final Stooges short directed by Raymond McCarey.
      Source: Raymond McCarey (crew)
      Added by MR77100 on 2009-05-09 07:07:11
      Status: Confirmed
      Team Stooge Comments: Ray McCarey directed many of Shemp's solo shorts at Vitaphone in the '30s, and also directed Shemp in the RKO feature film MILLIONAIRES IN PRISION (1940).


  • THREE LITTLE SEW AND SEWS (1939)
    • In the final scene where the Stooges play angels, they were hung by piano wire for a special effects shot. Larry was the lightest of the three, so hung above Moe and Curly. Afraid he might fall, he asked Del Lord to make him the low man. When they prepared to shoot, Larry was hoisted to the high spot and screamed. Lord responded, "You are up there and going to stay up there until we finish the goddam shot!" Larry stopped whining and the shot was completed.
      Source: The Stoogephile Trivia Book
      Added by MR77100 on 2009-04-24 09:25:35
      Status: Confirmed


  • THREE LITTLE TWIRPS (1943)
    • This was the second and final short to be directed by Harry Edwards, and for good reason. Supposedly, the actors and actresses he picked could not act. When problems on the set erupted, he would put the blame on the Stooges themselves. As a result, he was relieved of his duties as director and never worked with the Stooges again.
      Source: Moe Howard and the Three Stooges
      Added by MR77100 on 2009-05-03 11:33:06
      Status: False
      Team Stooge Comments: Yes, the 2nd and final short directed by Edwards, whose issues arose from general unreliability caused by alcoholism. But the unnamed director with an eye for ladies, as discussed in Moe's book, is not Harry Edwards, nor does the passage make mention of the director being terminated. In fact, the womanizing, buck-passing director that Moe was talking about was Jules White.


  • THREE PESTS IN A MESS (1945)
    • The last short to feature Curly's classic "Woo Woo Woo," which was dubbed in at the ending scene where they run from the open grave.
      Source: THREE PESTS IN A MESS (1945)
      Added by MR77100 on 2009-05-10 01:50:54
      Status: Confirmed


  • TRICKY DICKS (1953)
    • This was the third short in a row to feature stock footage from HOLD THAT LION!
      Source: Moe, Larry & Shemp Filmography
      Added by MR77100 on 2010-02-24 12:02:31
      Status: Confirmed


  • UNCIVIL WARRIORS (1935)
    • This short was the Stooges debut of Ted Lorch.
      Source: Ted Lorch (cast database)
      Added by ProfessorStooge on 2010-06-07 11:30:30
      Status: Confirmed


  • WHAT'S THE MATADOR? (1942)
    • While talking in Spanish, the Mexican man giving the Stooges what they think are directions on how to find Delores is actually giving them instructions to jump into a river and drown themselves.
      Source: The Complete Three Stooges
      Added by MrHaroldG2000 on 2011-01-15 05:28:15
      Status: Confirmed
      Team Stooge Comments: Due to its open access data policy (i.e., lack of editorial control), Wikipedia is not an accepted source of information for use on this website.


  • WOMAN HATERS (1934)
    • Marjorie White was killed in an automobile accident shortly after the production.
      Source: The Three Stooges Scrapbook
      Added by archiezappa on 2009-03-22 07:44:06
      Status: Confirmed
      Team Stooge Comments: Ms. White died 8/21/35, more than a year after filming WOMAN HATERS.

    • This was the debut of supporting actor Bud Jamison, who also had the honor of being the first to perform the eye-poke routine in a Stooges short.
      Source: WOMAN HATERS (1934)
      Added by MR77100 on 2009-06-09 10:02:47
      Status: Confirmed

    • The only Stooge short directed by Archie Gottler.
      Source: WOMAN HATERS (1934)
      Added by MR77100 on 2010-05-10 12:57:23
      Status: Confirmed


  • YOU NAZTY SPY! (1940)
    • This was the first short to feature the Columbia logo and the Stooges heads together during the opening credits, although the long intro to the "Three Blind Mice" theme would be cut off with the next short.
      Source: YOU NAZTY SPY! (1940)
      Added by MR77100 on 2009-04-19 12:46:24
      Status: Confirmed

    • This was the first American comedy film to parody Adolf Hitler.
      Source: STOOGES: THE MEN BEHIND THE MAYHEM
      Added by ProfessorStooge on 2010-09-28 05:09:23
      Status: Confirmed

    • Toward the end of almost all of Moe's Hitler impersonations, he finishes with "In pupik gehabt haben." In Hebrew this means "I've had it in the bellybutton!" Also, "Beblach" means "Beans" in Hebrew.
      Source: The Three Stooges Book of Scripts Vol. 1
      Added by BeAStooge on 2010-11-02 11:33:05
      Status: Confirmed
      Team Stooge Comments: Submitted by member "CannedCoin."

      Note: Beans was Helen Howard's nickname for her husband Moe.



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